Technology & Society

COLLOQUIA SERIES

The series, honoring Daniel J. Doyle, a professor emeritus and the College’s 1984 Master Teacher, features presentations by noted authors and academics and will challenge audiences to consider the impact of technology on our society.

Presentation Description

Energy seems to always make the news. Topics such as peak oil, CO2 emissions, hydrocarbons, renewables, batteries, and nuclear power are talked about and debated. This lecture provides a gentle introduction to the basics of energy. What do we mean by energy? How much energy do we use and why? Where does our energy come from? What might it take to change our energy portfolio? What are the challenges of changing our energy use patterns? We will address these and other questions and then highlight some of the energy-related research going on at Notre Dame.

Presenter Biography

Edward Mcginn

Edward J. Maginn

Edward J. Maginn received a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from Iowa State University and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to attending graduate school, he worked as a process engineer for Procter and Gamble. Since 1995, he has been on the Notre Dame faculty and currently holds the Dorini Family Chair of Energy Studies in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Dr. Maginn has been the recipient of a number of awards including: the Early Career Award from the Computational Molecular Science and Engineering Forum of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the ASEE Dow Outstanding New Faculty Award, the BP College of Engineering Outstanding Teacher Award and the NSF Career Award. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. In addition, he serves as a trustee of the CACHE Corporation, a non-profit that develops computer-based educational materials for chemical engineering education. Dr. Maginn’s research focuses on the development and use of atomistic molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation methods to study the thermodynamic and transport properties of materials, with special emphasis on ionic systems important in energy storage and use.

Bibliography

“Energy for Future Presidents: The Science Behind the Headlines”, Richard Muller, W. W. Norton Co., 2012

“Energy: The Subtle Concept”, Jennifer Coopersmith, Oxford University Press, 2010

“Climate Change: A Wicked Problem”, Frank Incropera (former Dean of Notre Dame Engineering), Cambridge University Press, 2016