Introduction to Welding Processes

WEL100

Designed to give the non-welding major competencies in the three main welding processes used in industry today: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Introduction to oxy-acetylene and plasma cutting systems will be included.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Acetylene/Electric Welding

WEL101

Introduction to acetylene and electric welding for HVAC students. Acetylene welding of sheet metal. Oxyacetylene cutting and brazing. Basic skills in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Oxygen Fuel Welding (OFW). Spring Only.

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Welding Blueprint and Layout

WEL102

Introduction to blueprint reading fundamentals specifically for students in the welding field. Emphasis on the interpretation and understanding of mechanical drawings, specifications, and notes. The American Welding Society (AWS) welding symbols and related applications found in the welding and fabrication industry are covered. Fundamentals of CAD are introduced and used to layout projects and interpret prints.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Collision Repair Welding

WEL105

Designed to prepare collision repair students with the needed welding competencies to return a vehicle to its pre-accident condition. Oxy-acetylene welding, gas metal arc welding, and gas tungsten arc welding are covered. Introduction of cutting operations with oxy-fuel and plasma systems will be included.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Shielded Metal Arc I

WEL114

Introduction to the principles and practices of basic Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) using various types of mild steel electrodes in multiple positions with emphasis put on the flat and horizontal positions. The fundamentals of AC and DC current and various types of power sources will also be covered.

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL116

Shielded Metal Arc II

WEL116

Practical application of the hands-on activities introduced in WEL114: Shielded Metal Arc I. Development of practical hands-on techniques with various power sources using AC and DC current in multiple positions with the emphasis on fat and horizontal.

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL114

Gas Metal Arc I

WEL120

Introduction to the principles and practices of basic Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) applied to ferrous metals. Study includes single and multi-pass welds using a variety of electrode wire types, diameters and transfer modes.

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL124

Gas Tungsten Arc I

WEL123

Introduction to the principles and practices of basic Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process. Theory is applied to related equipment, electrical concepts, material properties, arc characteristic, puddle control, and appropriate application of filler materials. Welding of ferrous and non-ferrous metals in multiple positions is covered.

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL129

Gas Metal Arc II

WEL124

Practical application of hands-on activities introduced in WEL 120: Gas Metal Arc I. Activities include fundamentals applications on ferrous metals in multiple positions using various modes of metal transfer and wire electrodes.

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL120

Gas Tungsten Arc II

WEL129

Practical application of the hands-on activities introduced in WEL123: Gas Tungsten Arc I. Development of techniques with emphasis on the welding of ferrous and non-ferrous metals in various joint configurations. Welding will be done utilizing multiple positions.

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL123

Flux Cored I

WEL132

Introduction to the principles and practices of Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) using various types of mild steel electrodes in multiple positions. The American Welding Society's (AWS) numbering system for FCAW will be explained. Other topics include technical terms, gases, their mixtures, and the various types of filler materials.

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL136

Flux Cored II

WEL136

Practical applicatios of the hands-on activities introduced in WEL132: Flux Cored I. Development of techniques with the flux-cored arc welding process using semi-automatic machines in mutiple positions with a variery of electrode wires, diameters and gases.

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL132

Advanced Semi-Automatic Processes I

WEL211

Principles and applications of advanced modes of transfer for Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) applied to ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Continuation of single- and multi-pass welds using a variety of electrode wire types, diameters and transfer modes. Emphasis on modified short circuit (STT, RMD, CMT), GMAW-CV and GMAW-P for aluminum and stainless steels and Submerged Arc Welding (SAW).

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL212

Prerequisites:
WEL120

Advanced Semi-Automatic Processes II

WEL212

Continued laboratory practice of advanced Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW-CV, -P, STT, RMD, CMT and SAW) introduced in WEL211: Advanced Semi-Automatic Processes. Activities include fundamental applications on ferrous pipe and tubing, and non-ferrous metals in all positions using various modes of metal transfer and wire electrodes.

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL211

Prerequisites:
WEL124

Gas Tungsten Arc III

WEL215

Principles and applications of advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) applied to pipe and tube weldments utilizing various filler rod and electrode sizes. Theory of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (STAW) on ferrous and non-ferrous metals in all positions are covered. (formerly WEL213)

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL215

Prerequisites:
WEL123 and WEL129

Gas Tungsten Arc IV

WEL220

Continued laboratory practice of advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) introduced in WEL 215: Gas Tungsten Arc III. Activities include fundamentals of joining pipe in multiple positions using various joint designs, electrode types and sizes. Emphasis on the extensive welding of ferrous pipe and tube utilizing the cup walking method. (formerly WEL219)

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL215

Prerequisites:
WEL123 and WEL129

Shielded Metal Arc III

WEL221

Principles and applications of advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) applied to various joint designs and positions using a variety of electrode types and sizes. Introduction of weld procedure specifications (WPS), procedure qualification report (PQR), codes, standards, and specifications as it pertains to the welding industry. (formerly WEL230)

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Prerequisites:
WEL114 and WEL116

Shielded Metal Arc V

WEL223

Continued laboratory practice of advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) introduced in WEL 221: Shielded Metal Arc III. Activities include fundamentals of joining plate in multiple positions using various joint designs, electrode types and sizes. Emphasis on the vertical and overhead positions utilizing the open root and backing bar methods. (formerly WEL234)

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL221

Prerequisites:
WEL114 and WEL116

Shielded Metal Arc IV/Pipe Welding

WEL225

Principles and applications of advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) applied to pipe and tube weldments utilizing various filler rod and electrode sizes. Continuation of weld procedure specifications (WPS), procedure qualification report (PQR), codes, standards, and specifications as used in the pipe welding industry. (formerly WEL233)

2 Credits: 1 Lecture, 3 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL227

Prerequisites:
WEL221 and WEL223

Shielded Metal Arc VI/Pipe Welding

WEL227

Continued laboratory practice of advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) introduced in WEL 225: Shielded Metal Arc IV/Pipe Welding. Activities include fundamentals of joining pipe in multiple positions using various joint designs, electrode types and sizes. Emphasis on the extensive welding of ferrous pipe and tube utilizing the up-hill and down-hill methods. (formerly WEL239)

2 Credits: 0 Lecture, 6 Lab

Corequisites:
WEL225

Prerequisites:
WEL221 and WEL223

Basic CNC Programming

WEL240

Introduction to the theory and applications of programming and operation of CNC cutting equipment. Set up of equipment, electrical concepts, and use of computer software to create programs. CAD/CAM software is used to produce and trouble shoot programs.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Prerequisites:
WEL102

Robotic Welding

WEL249

Introduction to robotics, robot classification and the application of robotics to the welding industry. Study includes the safety of robotics in industrial applications and different types of end effectors. Lab work includes operating various pieces of industrial equipment and robotic systems using computer and teach pendant modes. (formerly WEL248)

3 Credits: 1 Lecture, 6 Lab

Prerequisites:
WEL120

Welding Blueprint and Layout

WEL252

Principles and applications of advanced blueprint and layout skills used in the welding industry. Projects will be required to use various pieces of equipment to fabricate sheet, plate, tubing, pipe in various material types. Applicable codes and standards are used to ensure proper design and applications of the materials. 

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Prerequisites:
WEL102

Advanced High Energy Density Processes

WEL302

Continuation of the study of robotics, robot classification and the application of robotics to the welding industry. Emphasis on the introduction of Electron Beam Welding (EBW), laser welding and cutting (LW, LC), and plasma welding (PW).

4 Credits: 2 Lecture, 6 Lab

Prerequisites:
WEL248 and WEL249

Fabrication of Alloys

WEL400

Fundamental principles of welding metallurgy applied to the joining of ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Use of iron-carbon diagrams and isothermal transformation diagrams to show changes in material properties caused by heat. Lab topics to include cladding, joining of ferrous and nonferrous metals, surfacing, heat treatments, and corrosion. Fall Only.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Prerequisites:
MSC106

Industrial Project Support Systems

WEL401

Focus on continual process improvement projects with an emphasis on Deming's management philosophy, statistical process control (SPC), and other process improvement philosophies. Emphasis on successful completion of capstone project with moderate oversight by a faculty mentor using said philosophies. Projects will be monitored, adjusted, and reapplied to help solve quality improvement issues found in industry Spring Only.

3 Credits: 3 Lecture

Industrial Weld Design

WEL410

Introduction to the design, drawing, manufacturing engineering, and cost considerations of creating weldments. Includes engineering graphics review, estimation of welding costs, production considerations needed in designing and fabricating of weldments, tolerance dimensioning, mechanical and section properties of materials, load and stress analysis, and code requirements for welding. Codes covered include AWS D1.1, API 1104, and ASME Section 9. Fall Only.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Prerequisites:
CET230; or
CET275

Welding Codes and Procedures

WEL420

Review of standard welding terms and definitions along with the standard welding symbols used in the welding industry. Visual inspection of weld discontinuities commonly found in welding will be emphasized. The requirements and duties of the certified welding inspector will be discussed. Qualifications of welding procedures and specifications along with qualification of the welding operator are covered, with respect to AWS, API, and ASME standards. Spring Only.

3 Credits: 2 Lecture, 3 Lab

Prerequisites:
QAL237 and WEL102

Welding Internship

WEL495

Specialized off-campus, industry-based work experience applies knowledge and skills developed during Welding Technology and Welding and Fabrication Engineering Technology instruction. The experience also provides a functional understanding of the work environment, hones interpersonal and technical communication skills, and enhances social and civic competencies. Conducted in accordance with explicitly defined guidelines and procedures. This internship experience requires a minimum of 300 work experience hours, but may include more hours depending on the individual needs of the internship experience. In addition to work experience hours, students are also required to satisfactorily complete the internship experience through a final employer evaluation or assessment. Spring Only.

1 Credit: 0 Lecture, 5 Internship