SMART Girls
Facts

“The adolescent brain is still growing.”
Lauran Neergaard, "Study Peeks at How Normal Brains Grow," ABC News (Washington, May 18, 2007)
“[O]nly 19 percent of the SET [Science, Engineering, and Technology] workforce is female ... ”
Land of Plenty: Diversity as America’s Competitive Edge in Science, Engineering and Technology (Report of the Congressional Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering and Technology Development, 2000), 16.
“As of 2002, 11 percent of engineers were women.”
National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2004, NSF 04-317 (Arlington, VA, 2004).
“Nearly 75% of tomorrow’s jobs will require use of computers; fewer than 33% of participants in computer courses and related activities are girls.”
U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Labor Statistics: JOBS 2000 (Washington, D.C., 2000).
“By eighth grade, twice as many boys as girls (independent of race/ethnicity) show an interest in SET [Science, Engineering, and Technology] careers.”
Congressional Commission on the Advancement of Women and Minorities in Science, Engineering and Technology Development, Land of Plenty: Diversity as America's Competitive Edge in Science, Engineering and Technology (Washington, D.C., 2000).
“The female share of bachelor's degrees in computer sciences dropped from 37 percent in 1985 to 28 percent in 2001.”
National Science Foundation, Division of Science Resources Statistics, Women, Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities in Science and Engineering: 2004, NSF 04-317 (Arlington, VA, 2004).
“Girls make up only a small percentage of students in computer science and computer design classes. … Girls use computers less often outside of school. … Boys exhibit higher computer self-confidence and a more positive attitude about computers than do girls.”
American Association of University Women Educational Foundation Executive Summary, Gender Gaps: Where Schools Still Fail Our Children (Washington, D.C., 1998).
“Over the last decade the average SAT math scores are rising. The 2002 average of 516 is the highest in 32 years. The average for women was 500—the highest in 35 years. The 534 average for males remains higher, but the gap is closing perhaps due to an increasing number of females who are taking rigorous math and science courses in high school. "Forty-four percent of female college-bound seniors reported taking precalculus, up from 31 percent a decade ago.”
College Entrance Examination Board, 10-year trend in SAT scores indicates increased emphasis on math is yielding results; Reading and writing are causes for concern. College Board launches national commission to promote writing skills of country’s youth (Washington, D.C., August 27, 2002).
“If you look at course enrollments and test-taking in biology, math and even chemistry, you see dramatic gains for females over the past 10 to 15 years. … But 85 percent of students in college engineering programs are male … and two out of three physics majors are male…. When it comes to computer training … the gap is getting worse. A decade ago, 65 percent of college computer majors were male…. That number is now 75 percent.”
Christian Toto, "Closing the gender gap," The Washington Times (Washington, D.C., June 3, 2002).

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